Dublin-Worthington News Stories

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Friday, June 18, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell
If you have anything you would like published in our newsletter please email Tara Maxwell at tara.burchett@yahoo.com

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Trivia Night! June 30th's RAH RAH

Friday, June 18, 2021 By: Katie McCartney


Just in case the image doesn't work:
Trivia Hosted by:  Drew Shuneson
When:  June 30, 2021
Time:   6 to 8 PM
Where:  Woody’s Wing House
161 E Campus View Blvd, Columbus, OH 43235

RSVP: http://bit.ly/20210630RAHRAH or Katie@KatieMcCartney.com, Cell:  614-439-1874, Office:  614-918-9942
Remember:  Woody’s will be staffing for how many sign-up
Note:  It will be buy your own food and drinks.

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Member Celebrations

Friday, June 18, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell
Happy Birthday to Allan Woo on June 27! 

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Member Spotlight: Joe Patchen

Friday, June 18, 2021 By: Paul J. Cynkar
Advancing the Leadership Mindset
Finding Success in the Success of Others
This is another in a series of member profiles based on discovery interview questions that were designed to get an up close view of the traits and strengths of some of the members who provide leadership to this organization.
Membership Spotlight:  Joe Patchen
A Convivial and Colorful Connector
Tell us about yourself.  Give us three facts that include information about your family, your career and your pastimes.
I grew up in Worthington, attended Worthingway Middle School, Worthington High School, Boston College (during the Doug Flutie era) and law school at The Ohio State University.  My wife, Sara (a special education teacher) and we still live in Worthington.  Our kids, Sam and Addie, attend Thomas Worthington High School. I have been a business and real estate attorney since 1987 at the law firm of Carlisle, Patchen and Murphy. In my spare time I like reading, history, politics and military history and bicycling. My current hoppy is building model airplanes

How long have you belonged to Rotary?  What’s the best thing about membership?

Initially I joined the downtown Columbus Rotary but it wasn’t a good fit for me.  Courtney Chapman and Tim Shear encouraged me to join the Dublin-Worthington Rotary in 2017.  I feel that Rotary gives me so many opportunities to engage in, and serve, the community.  I enjoy being part of the program committee and connecting with the speakers who add a learning component to our AM and PM meetings.

As you look back on your life and your career, where and when did you have the biggest impact on others?  Who was impacted and how?

Sometimes it is hard to see the impact I’ve made.  I had a leadership role with the Clintonville Chamber of Commerce during an especially trying time for them.  I have done, and continue to do, pro bono legal work in the tenant/landlord arena.  Work in this field has accelerated during COVID.  I have made an impact with numerous clients over the span of my career but I’ve also served on the boards of several businesses and not-for-profits.

As you look back, which of the opportunities you’ve had has been the most fulfilling to you personally?  Why?


One of my strengths is problem-solving so I am most fulfilled when I get the opportunity to do what I do best. I love thorny thought problems that also involve diplomacy.  Most often these are technical problems involving humans.  My profession provides lots of opportunities to do engage in technical problems with some very complicated human elements too.

Describe the most challenging project you’ve ever worked on.  What was your role?  What was the result?  What did you learn?

The most colorful ones always come to mind.  Once I helped save a family farm from being turned in to a mini-bike track.  Many of the challenges involve real estate situations, business partnerships and family matters and they all involve emotion.

What are some things you are passionate about?  What really excites you? What gets your adrenalin flowing?  What makes your heart sing?

I like to see cooperative efforts, especially when it helps to bring a community together.  I am thrilled when people put away their differences.  I think I am a combination of secretary of defense (right and wrong/black and white) and secretary of state (negotiations, resolutions and wise choices.)

What are you especially skilled at?  What is something that others often tell you that they think makes you stand out?

I think I’m a good issue spotter for clients – it is important to see the wider picture and not get too fixated on one aspect.  Also, resolving or structuring solutions for feuding owners is a niche for me.

When you have a moment to sit back and think (dream) about your future, what do you think about?  What things would you like to do in your life that you haven’t gotten around to yet?  Is there something else you would like to accomplish?

I’m fifty nine years old with kids still in high school.  Retirement is not in the immediate future but school events, sports, graduation and college definitely are.  Sometimes I think about travel.  My bucket list includes the Zion National Park, Yellowstone National Park and Moscow, Russia.  (Please note that I took Russian language classes at Worthington High School.  I’d like the opportunity to apply my learning.)

If you could choose anyone (alive or deceased) to have lunch with, who would it be? Why?

Ben Franklin…he was convivial and interesting.  (Editor’s note:  Joe is a lot like Ben Franklin.)
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Next Club Meeting

Friday, June 18, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell
Jim Miller would like to state the importance of signing up for the hybrid meetings when he sends the email. Please respond if you are attending so we can better prepare/set up for upcoming meetings. 
All meetings are now hybrid. There will still be an option to attend via zoom. Meetings will be held at Worthington School Center (200 East Wilson Bridge Rd.) until the end of July. 

The last meeting of June (23rd) we will be swearing in our new President, Steve Payerle and celebrating our award winners: 
Rotarian of the Year: Steve Payerle
Rookie of the Year: Paul Cynkar
5 Avenues of Service winner: John Butterfield
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Announcements

Friday, June 18, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell
The Bill Shantz Memorial Golf Outing
September 20th, 2021
Organized by the Powell Chamber of Commerce
Starts at 8am at Scioto Reserve

More details to come. Share

June 16, 2021: Hybrid meeting

Friday, June 18, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell
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Member Spotlight: Matt Greeson

Friday, June 11, 2021 By: Paul J. Cynkar

Advancing the Leadership Mindset 
Finding Success in the Success of Others 

This is another in a series of member profiles based on discovery interview questions that were designed to get an up close view of the traits and strengths of some of the members who provide leadership to this organization. 

Membership Spotlight: Matt Greeson 
Ethical and Composed/Team and Consensus Builder 

Tell us about yourself.  Give us three facts that include information about your family, your career and your pastimes. 

My journey has taken me from Charleston, West Virginia to Little Rock, Arkansas to Ormond Beach, Florida Deland, Florida (between Orlando and Daytona) and thirteen years ago (2007) to Worthington, Ohio. My dad was a city planner in Charleston then in Little Rock.  He ran a regional Council of Governments in Florida.  (That should explain part of my journey.) My mother was an educator.  My wife is from Marietta, Ohio.  She is a third grade teacher at Worthington Estates. We have two kids in high school, one at Linworth and the other at TWHS.  I am Worthington’s city manager, and with my team, serve and try to shape our community to make a lasting impact.  My kids participate in field hockey, track, swimming and water polo so they take up most of my free time.  I also like to bike and I have participated in Pelatonia. 

How long have you belonged to Rotary?  What’s the best thing about membership? 

I was first active in Rotary when I was in Deland, Florida and now for over fifteen years.  Rotary engages a diverse group of people in a variety of professions.  I love the camaraderie and enjoy participating in service projects when I can.  It connects me to different people and avenues of service than I may otherwise might be exposed to. The Four Way Test provides a positive structure for membership as well as personal and professional relationships.  This aligns with my personal values and commitment to ethics and professionalism in government. Today I am looking forward to getting back to in-person meetings.  

As you look back on your life and your career, where and when did you have the biggest impact on others?  Who was impacted and how?  

Participation in local government is a great fit for me.  I started my local government career as an ocean rescue lifeguard.  Local government gives me the opportunity to do something that improves the quality of life in the community.  Leadership is not about me.  I most enjoy putting together effective teams who collectively make an impact. 

As you look back, which of the opportunities you’ve had has been the most fulfilling to you personally?  Why? 

It has to be participation in local government.  Beyond the good fit, I like the people, the mission and the culture.  Every day is different, every day provides some challenge.  In twenty-five years I have never been bored!  Cities are the keepers of the whole and provide a wide array of services people rely on every single day from police, fire and EMTs, recreation, land use, zoning to picking up trash on Friday.  But, the relationships I have been able to develop have been the most fulfilling. 

Describe the most challenging project you’ve ever worked on.  What was your role?  What was the result?  What did you learn? 

It’s hard to pinpoint just one challenge.  I have had the opportunity to work during critical events like hurricanes, wildfires, tornadoes and the 2000 election recount.  I have always enjoyed seeing communities rise to the challenge those events present. Land and labor disputes, where there is significant disagreement and emotion and which require the ability to navigate to consensus, are the toughest.  Did I mention these are often highly political too? 

What are some things you are passionate about?  What really excites you? What gets your adrenalin flowing?  What makes your heart sing?  

My family would top the list of things I’m passionate about.  Beyond that I love working with people.  I enjoy creating or being part of cohesive teams that get along and get things done.  I love seeing people learn, grow and succeed.   

What are you especially skilled at?  What is something that others often tell you that they think makes you stand out? 

An erstwhile critic once said that equanimity is one of my strengths.  They observed that I don’t get easily rattled and I stay calm under pressure.  I’ll accept that.  In addition, I don’t take things personally.  I strive to contribute to consensus. I feel like I am good at identifying the best people and the best in people. 

When you have a moment to sit back and think (dream) about your future, what do you think about?  What things would you like to do in your life that you haven’t gotten around to yet?  Is there something else you would like to accomplish? 

I envision always being involved in some type of service capacity.  I enjoy local government and the way it shapes a community and improves people’s lives.  I still feel a strong need to help people in need.  It’s an itch I still want to scratch. 

If you could choose anyone (alive or deceased) to have lunch with, who would it be? Why? 

I’d invite two people to lunch.  First would be Nelson Mandela, the former president of South Africa. I believe he was the greatest leaders and political figure of our time.  Despite the incredible injustices he faced, he was all about healing, forgiveness and pulling people together. I’d also invite my father, who passed away when I was nineteen.  There was so much more I could have learned from him.  Plus he would get a kick out of going to lunch with Nelson Mandela too. 

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Member Celebrations

Friday, June 11, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell

Birthday:
Happy Birthday to Alan Zink: June 16

Anniversaries:
Connie and Bill Hendren, June 18 – 29 years
Tim and Lori Moats, June 18 – 33 years

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Next Club Meeting

Friday, June 11, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell
Jim Miller will be doing a presentation. Share

June 9, 2021: Hybrid meeting

Friday, June 11, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell
This was the 40th meeting of the 46th year of the Dublin-Worthington Rotary Club.

There was one guest today, Bill Best.

"Happy Dollars"
1. Phil Geissler announced that each member in attendance (in person only) will donate one happy dollar. He added that since Alan attends and he drives 25-35 miles to do so, he owes another $2. 
2. Jim Miller's daughter is transitioning to be the minister of a new church in Philly. She will have a week of vacation in-between the transition of the 2 churches. Jim will be visiting her and getting to see his 2 youngest grandchildren. 
3. Steve Payerle got a new set of golf clubs and hopes that he "won't embarrass himself anymore". 
4. Teresa Russell added her happy dollar that she chipped a birdie. Wow!

Our speaker was introduced by Joe Patchen. Mark Ditullio is an experienced bankruptcy lawyer who has his own firm here in Columbus. He gave us an overview of consumer bankruptcy law, common misconceptions, trends, and emerging issues.
His presentation is titled, "Surviving a pandemic of debt, AKA How and what to do when debt goes viral".  An important fact of bankruptcy is that it won't get rid of criminal charges or liens. It is only to help with debt. 
1. Super spreaders of debt: death, disability, and/or divorce. These are the main events that lead consumers to Mark.
2. Virus: secured and unsecured debt. When debt is in default the person will get 3 notices followed by a certified letter, and then a default judgment will go into place. The judgement then goes to a collection attorney. The attorney can then take action by doing things like putting a lien on a property (secured debt) for 5 years. This can start proceedings into foreclosure of the property. The attorney can also send an order to the bank(s) to collect funds and order a garnishment of wages/commissions (unsecured debt). Garnishments are only 25% of the net pay. Exemptions to the 25% are earning only minimum wage and when you have 25% already going to child and/or spousal support. The debtor would need to file for an exemption hearing. The IRS and the State are also exemt to the 25% rule.
3. Home remedies: paying debt late but in full
A) Workouts: Pay into your unsecured debt and work on a negotiation of terms with your creditors. There is a tax liability on this option. Anything forgiven that is over $500 you will recieve a 1099 for the difference because it is considered income. 
B) Homeopathy: Pay your debt through credit counseling services. There will be no tax penalty.
C) Urgent care: Pay your debt through a Receivership/Trusteeship. This is where you agree to the 25% garnishment. You pay your debt to the court and they distribute the payments. 
4. Treatments: the hospital 
A) Chapter 13, wage earner plan: You give up a percentage of your future income to get rid of the unsecured creditors. This takes 3-5 years and then the rest of the debt is discharged. 
B) Chapter 7, bankruptcy: You give up your property valued $525 and over to get rid of creditors (excluding the exemptions) and you can acquire new debt/property the day after this is filed. 

Here is the link if you would like to watch: https://youtu.be/KPGgThGiZB0

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Service Opportunity

Friday, June 11, 2021 By:

Due to inclement weather and not enough sign-ups we needed to reschedule a couple of the service projects from the Service Project Blitz.  We need 25 Rotarians to complete this service project.  We will be painting a garage, moving a fence and doing general yard work.  This house is owned by Reaching the Nations International, who mentors, tutors, inspires and encourages young people in the neighborhood.  Several young people have benefited by the work that RTNI has done and they have a lot to be proud of in the work they do.

Project Location:
473 N. Ohio Avenue
Columbus, Ohio

Saturday June 19
9:00 am - 2:00 pm


RTNI has received a grant to pay for all of the supplies and District 6690 has agreed to supply the volunteers.  Please join us on what will surely be a rewarding service project.

 *   Lunch will be provided.
 *   Plenty of Parking at Church or Elementary School behind the house.
 *   Please bring loppers, rakes, shovels, work gloves, small tree saw and any other outdoor tools you think might be needed.

Sign up at:

https://www.signupgenius.com/go/10C0C4FAAAB29AB9-rotary1

Thanks for helping!


Yours in Rotary,

   
Craig Maxey, Past District Governor
District 6690  Vice Governor


Zone 30 Assistant Regional Rotary Foundation Coordinator

The Rotary Club of Reynoldsburg-Pickerington 
Business: 614 866 4065
Cell:  614 563 6888
Email: craig@targetbusinessservices.com

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Announcements

Friday, June 11, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell
1. Our President-Elect needs your help!!!! Tech savvy? Zoom guru? Please reach out to Steve Payerle to help with Zoom for our hybrid meetings. We would love a couple more people in the rotation. Thank you to Kip Patterson, Mark Beaver, Alan Grossman, and Katie McCartney for volunteering already!

2. Jim Miller would like to state the importance of signing up for the hybrid meetings when he sends the email. Please respond if you are attending so we can better prepare/set up for upcoming meetings. 
All meetings are now hybrid. There will still be an option to attend via zoom. Meetings will be held at Worthington School Center (200 East Wilson Bridge Rd.) until the end of July. 

3. Tim Shear invites the older children, nieces, cousins, etc. of members to join a 2nd Zoom call on June 20th at 930am to interact with english speaking kids in Mongolia. Kids may end up with an electronic, international Pen Pal! 

4. The last meeting of June (23rd) we will be swearing in our new President, Steve Payerle and celebrating our award winners: 
Rotarian of the Year: Steve Payerle
Rookie of the Year: Paul Cynkar
5 Avenues of Service winner: John Butterfield


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Member Spotlight: Chuck Gibson

Friday, June 4, 2021 By: Paul J. Cynkar
Advancing the Leadership Mindset
Finding Success in the Success of Others



This is another in a series of member profiles based on discovery interview questions that were designed to get an up close view of the traits and strengths of some of the members who provide leadership to this organization.

Membership Spotlight:  Chuck Gibson
Literate, Likeable, Library Leader

Tell us about yourself.  Give us three facts that include information about your family, your career and your pastimes
I grew up in Dodge City Kansas, then moved to Colorado.  I was a history major and a geology minor at Emporia State before I turned to food service then library science.  My mom is a librarian, in fact we went to graduate school in library science school together.  I came to Worthington in 1995 as the information technology coordinator for the Worthington Library.  After 12 years I moved to Valdosta, Georgia for several years but came back to Worthington when Maribah Mansfield retired.  Today my partner and I are celebrating 10 years together.  In my spare time I like to read a lot, engage in online auctions and do yard work.
How long have you belonged to Rotary?  What’s the best thing about membership?
I joined Rotary when I was in Valdosta, Georgia in 2008.  It was interesting.  They had a piano player and sang songs at their meetings.  I joined the Dublin-Worthington Rotary when I returned here.
As you look back on your life and your career, where and when did you have the biggest impact on others?  Who was impacted and how?
When I came to Worthington in 1995 the internet was just emerging.  I was the technology guy!  I helped design a technology system that was radically different than anything anyone had seen.  It put the Worthington Library at the forefront of libraries across the country.  We were able to combine my IT skills, Maribah’s vision, a skilled staff and great state and local funding to launch an incredible experience for this community.

As you look back, which of the opportunities you’ve had has been the most fulfilling to you personally?  Why?

It’s still a great feeling when I see a little kid in the library looking through a stack of books or exploring on a computer.  I often think about my first five years here.  Our team helped shape Worthington libraries and the profession in general.  We were truly high tech and high touch!  Maribah trained us on what libraries are and what they are supposed to be.
Describe the most challenging project you’ve ever worked on.  What was your role?  What was the result?  What did you learn?
For a short time I was the manager of a Texaco service station.  Everything from there was an improvement. Funding was a major challenge when I was in southern Georgia. It was a radically different culture than I was used to.  I was the “Yankee Boy”, sometimes referred to as “that damn Yankee!”  COVID has presented another set of challenges and there is no playbook on how to deal with it.  Not only have we had to respond to the chaos of the past year, we have to address issues in the future.  We have to evaluate and reevaluate everything we do.

What are some things you are passionate about?  What really excites you? What gets your adrenalin flowing?  What makes your heart sing?

I just absolutely love cars, all kinds of cars!  It is something I shared with my dad.  I grew up around hot rods so they have always been important.  I learned to drive when I was fourteen and I have had many more cars than most people.  The cars I most covet today are the Pontiac Fiero and the remake of the Ford Thunderbird.
What are you especially skilled at?  What is something that others often tell you that they think makes you stand out?
My background and training are in business, sales and library science.  In my current role I get to do the things that I do best.  People tell me I am a good at listener.  I try to let everyone else talk and add things I believe are relevant.  I don’t have a need to repeat what others have said.  Some call it “wise summation.”  I am a “hands off” leader with my staff.  They are very smart and talented.  Currently I see what fear, isolation and change that COVID have created for them.  I’m probably more assertive with my staff but I support them and believe in servant leadership.
When you have a moment to sit back and think (dream) about your future, what do you think about?  What things would you like to do in your life that you haven’t gotten around to yet?  Is there something else you would like to accomplish?
COVID is always on my mind.  I think about the processes needed to get us back to normal.  How do we put this back together?  What are staff expectations?  (Staff are the ones who create the magic that happens.) Despite advances in technology and audiobooks, I still believe that print is our bread and butter. 
If you could choose anyone (alive or deceased) to have lunch with, who would it be? Why?
It would be my grandmother.  She passed away in 2011.  I have so many questions for her.  I want to know more about the fascinating characters in her history and in our family.  There are many other questions that only she has answers for.
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Member Celebrations

Friday, June 4, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell
Member Anniversary:
Jennifer Best: 19 years as of June 12th

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Next Club Meeting

Friday, June 4, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell
Our speaker for next week will be Mark Ditullio who is an experienced bankruptcy lawyer who has his own firm here in Columbus. He will give us an overview of consumer bankruptcy law, common misconceptions, trends, and emerging issues.  

He will be joining via ZOOM from Lakeside.
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June 2, 2021: Virtual Meeting

Friday, June 4, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell
This was the 39th meeting of the 46th year of the Dublin-Worthington Rotary Club. 

"Happy Dollars"
1. Steve Payerle's daughter turned two and they had three wonderful birthday celebrations in her honor. He also was happy that he got in 9 holes of golf at the Memorial outing before it started to rain.
2. Tom Reis announced that he will be burning his mask today.
3. Jennifer Best spent Memorial weekend in Philly with her granddaughter and is already missing her grandbaby time.
4. Teresa Russell is excited that her daughter earned Gold in her first 2MM beach volleyball tournament. 

Announcement:
There will be no email registration for the June 9th hybrid breakfast meeting. Sign ups will resume with the next lunch meeting. 

Joe Patchen introduced our speaker, Laura Parker Roerden. She is the Executive Director of  Ocean Matters.
Ocean Matters is a not for profit which brings high school students to endangered marine ecosystems around the world for service projects performed on SCUBA. 
Ocean Matters has been operating for almost 10 years. Kids between the ages of 15 to 18 (pre college) can apply for the program. They run projects in Hawaii, Honduras, and Florida and like to take kids who they beleive will stay in their communities and give service back. The organization is financed mostly by individual donors and fees. The fee is $3500.00 per child but they do a split of 50% self pay and 50% scholorship. They work with groups of 12 to 20 kids per project and average 100 kids per year.
The number one challenge is getting the kids SCUBA certified. It usually takes about 5 days and then they can move on to the service. They have done clean ups, rebuilding, and restoration of habits. Each project lasts between 10 days to 2 weeks. 
The goal of Ocean Matters is youth empowerment. Laura explained that there are 4 foundational pillars for successful elements.
1. Self-efficacy
2. Grit and determination
3. Resilience and 
4. A sense of self belonging
This bonds the kids as it motivates them. They learn social responsibility, a sense of meaning, and a sense of place within the larger context. 
Arcadia Davies is the youth advocate leader for Ocean Matters in the Columbus area. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3-H-5Yy-tOQShare

Next Club Meeting

Friday, May 28, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell
Laura Parker Roerden, Executive Director of  Ocean Matters.
Ocean Matters is a not for profit which brings high school students to endangered marine ecosystems around the world for service projects performed on SCUBA. She will discuss the organization and its mission and anything else she darn well wants to, because whatever it is, it is sure to be interesting.

Laura Parker Roerden has over twenty-five years of experience in environmental education and educating for social responsibility. She is the executive director and founder of Ocean Matters and a fourth generation farmer. She holds a masters of education degree from Harvard University and a B.A. from Boston College and is a lecturer and author of many books, curricula and articles on young people’s social, emotional, and ethical development.

Laura has designed educational outreach projects for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the National Basketball Association, Pokemon USA, Olympians at Athletes for Character Education, Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream, AT&T, Operation Respect, Morningside Center for Social Responsibility, the National After-School Alliance, The Governor’s Task Force on Hate Crimes (MA), and the Resolving Conflict Creatively Program, as well as for various film, music and video projects including for Frontline and the Grammy-nominated children’s recording “Changing Channels.”

She is the former publisher and managing editor at Educators for Social Responsibility and former managing editor of the magazine New Designs for Youth Development. Laura has served on the board of directors of both Women Working for Oceans (W20), a fiscal partner of the New England Aquarium, as well as Earth, Ltd. of Southwicks Zoo and is a member of the Pleiades Network of Women in Sustainability.

Laura has taught marine education in a myriad of settings including traditional classrooms, on decks of science-at-sea programs, and 100-feet beneath the sea on scuba in ecosystems ranging from the rocky intertidal to the coral reef. She lives on a fifth generation family farm.

https://www.facebook.com/oceanmatters/



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Member Spotlight: Courtney Chapman

Friday, May 28, 2021 By: Paul J. Cynkar
Advancing the Leadership Mindset
Finding Success in the Success of Others


This is another in a series of member profiles based on discovery interview questions that were designed to get an up close view of the traits and strengths of some of the members who provide leadership to this organization.

Membership Spotlight:  Courtney Chapman
A Fascinating and Friendly Flyer

Tell us about yourself.  Give us three facts that include information about your family, your career and your pastimes.

Given that I’m 91 years old, I have a lot more than three things to share!  Along the way I’ve graduated from college, enlisted in the Navy, went to flight school, transferred to the Army National Guard, went to helicopter school, retired as a Lieutenant Colonel, served as an associate professor of aviation at the University of Illinois and The Ohio State University, moved to Worthington in 1959, married Barbara Avery in 1993, spent 25 years in disaster assistance with the Ohio and Federal  Emergency Management Agencies, served on Worthington’s city council, served as a trustee for the Walnut Grove and Flint cemeteries, facilitated divorce mediation, embarked on a 15 day trek with Barbara in the Himalaya’s going toward Mount Everest at 17,000 feet, then, when I was 70, we had  a trek up to the Kilimanjaro rim at 19,030 feet.  I also raised two children and hosted three international exchange students.  Honestly, I haven’t had much time for pastimes though recently I began a course in drawing. 

How long have you belonged to Rotary?  What’s the best thing about membership?
I joined Rotary forty-two years ago in 1979.  I have been the chairperson of the community service committee, I served as president during our tenth anniversary year and I have been involved in our International service projects. Rotary is my support group.  Rotary is like my family!
As you look back on your life and your career, where and when did you have the biggest impact on others?  Who was impacted and how?
Over time there have been a number of times when I felt I made an impact.  I coached and mentored an employee of the cemetery board and encouraged her success, I connected with a student from Brazil who was part of the Rotary International Scholarship Program and we have stayed in touch.  I mentored another young student from Taiwan who later had a successful career as a reporter in Los Angeles.  While with FEMA, I was part of a team that helped victims of disasters get access to assistance

As you look back, which of the opportunities you’ve had has been the most fulfilling to you personally?  Why?

The time I spent as director of operations working with students as part of two university aviation programs. I really enjoyed my time flying, teaching in a classroom and doing research.  I also enjoyed working with students in Rotary’s International Program.  Serving others and seeing them succeed has always been fulfilling to me.
Describe the most challenging project you’ve ever worked on.  What was your role?  What was the result? What did you learn?
I’ve experienced many challenges along the way.  It ranged from finding the right kind of heated flooring for airport hangars, to merging two cemeteries that had multiple jurisdictional issues, to long days and long assignments with FEMA that would have me working seven hours a day, seven days a week while being away from home for a month at a time.  Some of those FEMA assignments were heartrending!
What are some things you are passionate about?  What really excites you? What gets your adrenalin flowing?  What makes your heart sing?
As I mentioned before, working with young people, particularly international students, has always been a passion.  Gaining their trust is always an important first step and often leads to long relationships.  I have also enjoyed attending pilot meetings where both new and experienced pilots have the opportunity to share their experiences.
What are you especially skilled at?  What is something that others often tell you that they think makes you stand out?
I have been told that I am skilled at conducting meetings.  I am proud of my facilitation skills and the ability to run meetings that stay on task within the allotted time.  It’s important to recognize that attendees have busy schedules and little time to waste.  Barbara and I used that skill as mediators for couples who were struggling over the terms of their divorce.
When you have a moment to sit back and think (dream) about your future, what do you think about?
I often reflect on the relationships I’ve had with others and the desire to continue those relationships and start new ones.  Rotary is a great place to nurture relationships.
If you could choose anyone (alive or deceased) to have lunch with, who would it be? Why?
I would like to have lunch with Richard Engle.  He is the chief foreign correspondent for NBC News.  He has been everywhere.  He frequently meets with presidents, prime ministers and other world leaders.  He has covered wars in many parts of the world.  He is highly engaged and is part of the events he covers.  I find him fascinating.
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May 26, 2021: Hybrid meeting

Friday, May 28, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell
This was the 38th meeting of the 46th year of the Dublin-Worthington Rotary Club.

We had one guest today. Thank you Scott Watson of Union Bank for attending our meeting. 

"Happy Dollars" 
1. Shirley Lambert's eldest granddaughter graduates on June 9th from Hanover HS. She will go to Tufts in the fall and be part of their crew team. Her other granddaughter goes from middle to high school and she is part of the swim team. Their dad is also the coach of the swim team.
2. Pete Barnhart is happy to be back in Ohio. He also has a niece and granddaughter that are graduating and being honored this week.
3. Judy Barnhart is also celebrating graduations in her family. Sophia is gradutaing from high school and will be attending Scripps in the fall. Sage is graduating high school and will be going to American University. Samara is graduating 8th grade. 
4. Dave Hansen's granddaughter has achieved her Gold Award in Girl Scouts. Another granddaughter has a video on the internet that interviews Veterans and is a tribute to the legacy of US troops. 
5. John Butterfield's grandson, Noah, graduates Thomas Worthington HS and will attend Walsh University in the fall. Noah also is competing track. He runs the 4x8 and the 3200.
6. Jennifer Best was nominated and received the Thomas Worthington award for the Hall of Fame. She spoke at Thomas Worthington graduation ceremony and received her award 46 years after attending school there. 
What wonderful achievements by all!!!

Joe Patchen introduced our speaker; Bill Owens, LISW-S/ACSW. He is the Executive Director of the Clintonville-Beechwold Community Resources Center. 
The Beechwold Community Resource Center, or CRC, is in it's 50th year. They were started by North Broadway United Methodist Church by direction of Pastor Bob Erickson.The CRC is a Settlement house whose mission is to focus on helping the local geographics. Their 7 programs include:
1. The Food Pantry. The pantry is located at 14 W Lake View in the old Clintonville Library building. Fun fact: The building was purchased for $1.00 in 1981. They were able to double the amount of people they helped during Covid.
2. Case Management for seniors. This program mostly helps the zip code of 43214 which has the highest percentage of people over the age of 60 in Franklin County. Some things this program helps with include peronal finance management, transportation, meal delivery, and necessity bags.
3. A Kid's Club. This is typically an after school program but they were able to expand and help with full day school during the pandemic. 
4. Kinship Care helps people raising their relatives' children. This program reduces the number of kids ending up in Foster Care. 
5. The Village Movement is a network of community people who volunteer to lend a hand. 
6. A Community Garden and
7. Community Meals which has been the only thing that shut down during Covid. When they do these meals on Tuesdays people will help unload 10,000 lbs of produce for distribution on Wednesdays. 

There are two ways to volunter. You can call their main line at 614-268-3539 and ask for Ally or visit their website and use the Sign Up Genius.
If you are in need of services just call their main line at the number above. 
www.ClintonvilleCRC.org
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Member Celebrations

Thursday, May 27, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell
Happy Birthday to Pete Barnhart! June 3rd.

Club Anniversaries: 
Ron Hopper, 35 years: June 1st
Doug Southgate, 26 years: June 1st
Ken Carey, 26 years: June 1st

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May 20th Board Meeting Highlights

Monday, May 24, 2021 By: David O. Hansen

Discussed: Resumption of face-to-face club meetings.
Discussed: Sponsorship drawing and potential alternative fundraising activities.
Discussed: Community Service Committee planning activities.
Discussed: 2021 Scholarship Recipients.
     – Omar Mares for Two-Year Joint Scholarship (w/ Worthington A.M. Club at Columbus State).
     – Three individual $1,000 scholarships for Dublin High School Graduates.
Discussed: Activities of the Public Image and Communications Committee.
Discussed: Activities of the International Service Committee; next meeting to be held on May 27.
Discussed: Ways and Means Committee Report.
     – Planning for Club Labor Day Event on the Worthington Square.
     – $5,000 Lead Support Gift from FC Bank.
Discussed: Membership Committee plan to hold membership drive.
Discussed: Request for club members to provide speaker options to Program Committee.
Discussed: Club goals for 2021-2022 year, including financial and membership goals.
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Congratulations

Monday, May 24, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell
Jim Farmer made the following exciting announcements:

Rotarian of the Year goes to Steve Payerle!

Rookie of the Year goes to Paul Cynkar!

Last, but not least, the 5 Avenues of Service winner is John Butterfield!

Congrats to all and well done! Our club and communities are grateful to you! 
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Member Spotlight: Dr Trent Bowers

Friday, May 21, 2021 By: Paul J. Cynkar
Advancing the Leadership Mindset
Finding Success in the Success of Others

This is another in a series of member profiles based on discovery interview questions that were designed to get an up- close view of the traits and strengths of some of the members who provide leadership to this organization.

Membership Spotlight:  Dr. Trent Bowers
Dedicated, Disciplined and Genuine

Tell us about yourself.  Give us three facts that include information about your family, your career and your pastimes.
Basically I am an introvert and self-promotion is not one of my strengths. I don’t take myself too seriously.  Being superintendent is a role.  I try to look in the mirror every morning and say, “just be you!”  I grew up in Worthington.  I’ve been married to Doreen for twenty-six years. (We met on our first day at Taylor University in Upland Indiana.) We have three daughters and our oldest will be going to Taylor Univ. next year. I’m an educator by trade having spent time as a teacher, coach, dean of students, assistant principal and principal, assistant superintendent and now superintendent.  I like sports but on evenings when I don’t have meetings or events, I settle in with a good book.
How long have you belonged to Rotary?  What’s the best thing about membership?
I joined Rotary six years ago when I became superintendent of Worthington Schools.  I appreciate the relationships that are established and the opportunity to connect with others.
 
As you look back on your life and your career, where and when did you have the biggest impact on others?  Who was impacted and how?

I hope that story is still to be told.  I felt I made an impact in Marysville as a principal responsible for opening new schools.  Wherever I go I am committed to enhancing a positive culture.  It’s always a priority for me. 
As you look back, which of the opportunities you’ve had has been the most fulfilling to you personally?  Why?
Ultimately I enjoy bringing people together in a positive way.  I enjoy diversity of thought and opinion.  I feel super lucky to work with the people I work with.  They know what they are doing and make a continued effort to get better.  Our role is constantly evolving.  We have to navigate change and ensure the community is part of the decision-making process.
Describe the most challenging project you’ve ever worked on.  What was your role?  What was the result?  What did you learn?

Tackling the master facilities plan was definitely a challenge.  The need was real.  It required three phases; organizing a community task force, eliciting community feedback and addressing financial/tax issues.  (We had to continually consider the taxing capacity of the community.)  Today I am extremely proud of the community collaboration and our progress.  We have redesigned our middle schools and are looking ahead to addressing the needs of our high schools.   That said, the impact of COVID on our students, our staff and our schools has ranked way up there on the list of professional and personal challenges.  This has been the hardest year I’ve ever faced.  I’ve learned that when you try to make one person happy you tend to make another person angry.  My idea of leadership is do what is right and make decisions that benefit the most people.

What are some things you are passionate about?  What really excites you? What gets your adrenalin flowing?  What makes your heart sing?
Definitely creating a culture that emphasizes “being kind to kids!” We need to put kids first.  Schools should create positive memories regarding academic skills, social emotional well-being and relationship skills.  Schools are a community organization so we want residents to feel ownership and pride.  Our staff needs to engage in this too.  I expect their efforts to be more than just checking the box.
What are you especially skilled at?  What is something that others often tell you that they think makes you stand out?
Setting the vision and communicating the vision.  I’m not good at small talk but I really enjoy talking and writing about Worthington Schools. 
When you have a moment to sit back and think (dream) about your future, what do you think about?  What things would you like to do in your life that you haven’t gotten around to yet?  Is there something else you would like to accomplish?
Professionally I am where I want to be.  I have no different professional aspirations.  Personally I want to focus on my own kids as they navigate through school.  When I turn fifty Doreen and I would like to walk the Camino de Santiago, a network of pilgrim trails in northwestern Spain.  It’s popular with hiking and cycling enthusiasts.  Many consider it a spiritual path or retreat for their spiritual growth.
If you could choose anyone (alive or deceased) to have lunch with, who would it be? Why?
I’d want to have lunch with my grandfather, Ken Harrison.  He was a brilliant man who owned a Dale Carnegie franchise in Cleveland.  He was very successful.  I would want pick his brain to hear his thoughts about leadership and success.
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Next Club Meeting: Bill Owens LISW-S/ACSW

Friday, May 21, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell
This week's meeting is a hybrid meeting. 

Our speaker will be Bill Owens, LISW-S/ACSW. He is the Executive Director of the Clintonville-Beechwold Community Resources Center. Bill will talk about what his organization does, the challenges that our community has experienced, and how his organization has dealt with those challenges. 
www.ClintonvilleCRC.org
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May 19, 2021: Virtual meeting

Friday, May 21, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell
This was the 37th meeting of 46 year for the Dublin-Worthington Rotary Club.

This meeting was a Club Assembly. Members were divided into 4 separate groups for discussion on the following topics: 

1. How do we increase club leadership regarding committees and the board? 
2. How do we increase membership and the joy of the current members?
3. How do we increase our financial resources? 
4. How do we increase our service and our community impact? 

All notes from the breakout sessions will be compiled and sent to the entire club at a later date. 
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Member Celebrations

Friday, May 21, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell
Happy Birthday to: 
Todd Weithman, May 28 
Alan Grossman, May 29

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Announcement: Rotary Club Memorial Gold Outing

Wednesday, May 12, 2021 By: Michael E. Moulton
Date: Friday May 28th 2021
Location: Glenross Golf Club, Delaware, Ohio
Tee times starting at Noon
All payments for golf to be made to Glenross 
I believe that Sr. golfers pay $39 and all others pay $45
Send your individual or foursome group to Mike Moulton: mikemoulton61@gmail.com
Or call my cell  614-507-4395
This will be our 30th year for the memorial golf outing!
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Member Spotlight: Ann Pechacek

Wednesday, May 12, 2021 By: Paul J. Cynkar
Advancing the Leadership Mindset
Finding Success in the Success of Others
February, 2021

This is another in a series of member profiles based on discovery interviews that were designed to help me fulfill the requirements of the Dublin Worthington Rotary Red Badge Program for new Rotarians and get an up close view of the traits and strengths of some of the members who provide leadership to this organization.
Membership Spotlight:  Ann Pechacek
Harmony, Relator, Lifelong Learner


 
  1. Tell me about yourself.  Give me three facts that include information about your family, your career, and your pastimes. 
     
I am originally from Oklahoma and Oklahoma is in my blood!  From there I went to the University of Alaska (I always wanted to live there.) then back across country to Fayetteville, North Carolina.  I have been in Worthington since 2001 and I’m settled here.  I am the Lead Librarian at the Old Worthington Library where I spend a most of my time with working with kids and teens. 

 
  1. How long have you belonged to Rotary?  What’s the best thing about membership?

Chuck Gibson was responsible for leading me to Rotary.  Rotary gives me a chance to extend my work with teens as part of the Interact Club.  It also helps me meet new people and do volunteer work.
 
  1. As you look back on your life and your career, where and when did you have the biggest impact on others?  Who was impacted and how? 
     
I’d have to say it is working with teens.  I have met with many teens through the library and through book talks and book clubs.  I feel that the kids who come into the library really like books and books influence their lives and my greatest impact is getting that one reluctant teen or child the book that will lead them to a lifetime of learning and reading.
 
  1. As you look back, which of the opportunities you have/had has been the most fulfilling to you personally?  Why?
Again, working with teens.  I am fulfilled when I have the opportunity to make a difference for, or with, a teen.  I have been a librarian for 22 years and 21 of those years I focused on teens, now I have a chance to work with younger kids and recommend books for years to come.
 
  1. Describe the most challenging project you have ever worked on.  What was your role?  What was the result?
I’m proud to say that the challenges at work seem manageable even through 2020, the COVID-19 year.  I am ready for patrons to come back to the library.  I want to get back into schools for class visits and book clubs too.
  1. What are some things you are passionate about?  What really excites you? What gets your adrenalin flowing?  What makes your heart sing?
I love to travel and to experience different cultures.  I have been to Africa, the Czech Republic, Ireland, Italy, and a few more.  The list of places I’d like to visit is pretty lengthy.  Travel makes me happy and if it includes world-wide travel or local road trips I hope to continue to explore.

 
  1. What are you especially skilled at?  What is something that others often tell you that they think makes you stand out? 
People tell me I have a sense of humor.  They also say I focus on other people’s accomplishments rather than my own.
  1. When you have a moment to sit back and think (dream) about your future, what do you think about?
Hopefully retiring from the Worthington Libraries then moving closer to my sister who lives in Texas.  Scotland and Iceland are high up on my travel bucket list and I would like to go back to Africa.
  1. If you could choose anyone (alive or deceased) to have lunch with, who would it be? Why?   
My lunch partner would not be a celebrity or an author.  I would prefer to have lunch with my grandmother who passed away in the early 1990’s.  She was a volunteer librarian and loved to read.  I think we could have a great adult conversation.

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May 12, 2021: Hybrid meeting

Wednesday, May 12, 2021 By: Tara Burchett-Maxwell
This was the 36th meeting of the 46th year of the Dublin-Worthington Rotary Club.

Phil Giessler collected "Happy Dollars".
1. Phil says anyone that is not in central Ohio owes one happy dollar. 
2. David Kittredge has returned for the summer from his travels after dropping their boat in GA for repairs.
3. Sue Coady has 2 happy dollars. It is George's 84th birthday. HAPPY BIRTHDAY, GEORGE! Sue has returned from her trip to CA. She had a wonderful Mother's Day.
4. Alan Zink was happy to hear the speaker today because he went to school with Mollie's grandmother, grandfather, and uncle. He also recieved his Ensign Bars 59 years ago in FL.
5. Tim Shear was happy to see Mick Box on the call since he is in KY. Mick has a new grandchild in KY. 
6. Happy Dollars were given by various people to celebrate graduates of kindergarten, high school, and/or college.
A. Roe Mauro: Her granddaugther, Colette, is graduating from Kindergarten.
B. Tara Maxwell: Her youngest daugher, Harper, is graduating from Kindergarten. 
C. John Butterfield's grandson, Noah, is graduating from Thomas Worthington High School. 
D. David  Hanson's great-granddaughter, Josephine, is graduating from John F Kennedy High School in Berlin and then coming to stay with them this summer. She will attend Case Western this fall.
E. Jim Miller's grandson, Austin, is graduating from Dublin.
Congratulations to all! 

Announcements:
1. Tech and/or Zoom savvy? Steve Payerle is looking for a few individuals to take over the Zoom recording of the meetings. Please reach out to Steve if you are able to help.
2. Dave Jordan, Chair of the Ways and Means Committee, announced that the committee is planning a Labor Day Family Picnic. Thanks to John Butterfield FC Bank will be the Presenting Sponsor. The committee is needing our club members to assist by attending the next meeting of Ways and Means Committee and volunteer for activities  associated with this event. Please let Dave or Jim know if you are interested.

Speaker Highlights:
Teresa Russell introduced her niece, Mollie Sebald: Lieutenant Junior Grade Navy F-18 Pilot. 
Mollie grew up in Ohio and graduated from Gannon University as a Mechanical Engineer. She is a 4 year letter winner/ NCAA tournement basketball player. 
Mollie loves to travel and enjoys a team atmosphere so the U.S. Navy seemed an exciting option. 
Mollie got selected to Officer Canidate School (OCS) which she describes as an officer form of boot camp. This is a 12 week training program with Navy and Marine Drill Instructors. 
The first plane Mollie, and all, learn to fly is the T6. It is a single engine Prop aircraft that has 2000HP. Her next plane was the T45, another single engine. This is the Navy jet trainer. She did 8 months of strike fighter aviation which helped her earn the Wings of Gold in Penscola. She finished top in her class here. 
Mollie then chose to go to Virginia Beach and is now part of the Super Hornets.
Mollie flies in the back seat of the aircraft as a weapon systems operator. She compared it to Goose from Top Gun and said the transition from a single engine to a double engine was quite a change. Once you have earned your wings you spend a year training and learning to fly your particular aircraft. 
There are currently 3 females in her squadron.
Thank you for your service, Mollie!

Enjoy a recording of the meeting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RqcEu8Nd9Ik
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